Academic Interpretation

Recent Posts

  • America is Lost!

    Dr Angel Luke O’Donnell, Teaching Fellow in North American History, King’s College London Jump to Essay Transcription & Images The ‘America is Lost!’ piece was a short essay written by George III reviewing the causes and effects of the American Revolution. It potentially provides a fascinating insight into the thoughts of King George about the […]

  • Reflections on ‘Essay on Public Opinion’

    Dr Emrys Jones, Lecturer in Eighteenth-Century Literature and Culture, King’s College London Jump to Essay Transcription & Images It may be stating the obvious to point out that what was understood as constituting ‘public opinion’ in the eighteenth century bears little resemblance to the culture of opinion polls and click rates that often accompanies the […]

  • George III and the ‘German Empire’

    Dr Michael Rowe, Senior Lecturer in Modern European History, King’s College London George III’s relationship with Germany was less obviously intimate than that enjoyed by his two predecessors. He proudly and very publicly asserted his British identity, at the expense of his Hanoverian roots: ‘Born and educated in this country, I glory in the name […]

  • Practising monarchy: using digital history to rethink Queen Victoria

    Lee Butcher is a Collaborative Doctoral Award PhD researcher with King’s College London and English Heritage As a political historian and political geographer I am interested in how political practices, and institutions, develop over time, in place, and through space. My PhD research focuses on the role of the monarchy in Britain’s political development during […]

  • The Abdication Speech of George III

    Professor Arthur Burns, Vice Dean for Education, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Professor of Modern British History, King’s College London There are few more dramatic incidents in the recent history of the British monarchy than the abdication of Edward VIII on 11 December 1936, not least because the act was captured in such a vivid […]

  • ‘Farmer George’? Notes on Agriculture

    James Fisher, PhD candidate, History Department, King’s College London Background During his reign King George III acquired the nickname of “Farmer George”, in part due to his agricultural interests and in part as a playful pun – a nod toward nominative determinism given that the name George derived from the Greek word geōrgos (γεωργός) meaning […]

  • ‘Remarks on the Preface to the Account of the Musical Performance in Commemoration of Handel’, George III Remarks on the Preface to the Account of the Musical Performance in Commemoration of Handel’ George III

    Professor Matthew Head, Department of Music, Centre for Eighteenth-Century Studies, King’s College London Jump to Essay Transcription & Images This brusque memo in the hand of George III is a smoking gun. It is addressed to one Joah Bates, a naval administrator, antiquarian musician and Handel-enthusiast who directed the epochal performances of Handel’s music that […]

  • Eye Surgery in the Georgian Age

    Ayesha Hussain and Anna Maerker, Department of History, King’s College London                 In his old age, King George III suffered from blindness due to cataracts in both eyes.The affliction was movingly documented in portraits from 1820 by artists Charles Turner and Samuel William Reynolds (Figs.1-2). The King’s doctors […]

  • Medicine and the Georgian Navy

    Ayesha Hussain and Anna Maerker, Department of History, King’s College London The long sea voyages of the Georgian period took their toll on the health of sailors. Most dreaded of all was scurvy, a disease caused by Vitamin C deficiency. On a naval voyage to the South Seas under Captain George Anson in the 1740s, […]

  • “Awesome, Wow”: King George III in the American Popular Imagination

    Karin Wulf (Director, Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, Professor of History, College of William & Mary) As we consider the range and depth of materials emerging from the Georgian Papers Programme it’s clear that any number of historical subjects will be newly framed or newly illuminated.  And it’s likely that a more subtle […]