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George III in London: What Hamilton Tells Us About the King’s Role

Posted on: August 28th, 2018 by Omohundro No Comments

by Arthur Burns (King’s College London) and Karin Wulf (Omohundro Institute) We’ve written before for the Georgian Papers Programme about King George III in American popular culture, and about the importance of Hamilton to that oeuvre.  Seeing Michael Jibson in action in a brilliant take on the role of King George III in the award-winning London… Read More »

Jane Austen and the Prince Regent: The Very First Purchase of an Austen Novel

Posted on: July 24th, 2018 by Omohundro 2 Comments

During his time in the Royal Archives, Omohundro Institute Georgian Papers Programme fellow Nicholas Foretek found exciting new evidence that the first documented purchase of any novel by Jane Austen was made by none other than the Prince Regent (later George IV).  Moreover, the purchase—of Sense and Sensibility—was made two days before the book was advertised… Read More »

A Royal Christmas List

Posted on: December 23rd, 2017 by Omohundro No Comments

Robert Paulett, OI-GPP Fellow, shares this discovery from his recent work in Royal Archives. As the holiday shopping season intensifies in these last weeks, it is always tempting to wonder whether you should buy less. Should your non-plussed children balk at such an idea, you can cite as precedent the Christmas present list from the… Read More »

Hamilton’s George III in London

Posted on: December 6th, 2017 by Omohundro 1 Comment

by Karin Wulf Hamilton, a quintessentially American story, has arrived in London. While many American commenters and historians have focused on the “Ten Dollar Founding Father without a Father” and his compatriots, the racial politics of the founding period and the intentional casting of the musical, and the gendered politics of the Schuyler sisters and… Read More »

The Admiral and the Aide-de-Camp

Posted on: May 3rd, 2017 by Omohundro 4 Comments

The Revolutionary War Correspondence of Sir Samuel Hood and Jacob de Budé by Jim Ambuske, Ph.D. The portrait of one of the most important British naval officers to serve during the American War for Independence hangs in the Manchester Art Gallery in Manchester, England. The 1783 painting by famed artist Sir Joshua Reynolds depicts Rear… Read More »

Meeting the “humane and gracious sovereign”

Posted on: February 15th, 2017 by Omohundro No Comments

by Cynthia Kierner, Omohundro Institute Georgian Papers Programme Fellow and Professor of History at George Mason University Looking through thousands of Hanoverian manuscripts in the Royal Archives at Windsor Castle was an amazing experience that gave me a deeper understanding of the Georgian era. The letters exchanged between George III and Lord North, for instance,… Read More »

The Georgian Papers Programme: Slave Trade, Slavery and Abolition in the Royal Archives, c. 1785–1810

Posted on: January 23rd, 2017 by Omohundro No Comments

The Georgian Papers Programme: Slave Trade, Slavery and Abolition in the Royal Archives, c. 1785–1810[1] by Suzanne Schwarz (University of Worcester) Georgian Papers Programme Fellow, 2016 The award of a Georgian Papers Programme Fellowship, funded by the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture in Williamsburg, Virginia, provided an invaluable opportunity to trace how… Read More »

What Digital Does: Queen Charlotte Online

Posted on: January 21st, 2017 by Omohundro 1 Comment

by Karin Wulf See also An Analog King in a Digital Age Scholars of women, gender, family, domesticity, fashion, food, and so much more will have plenty of fodder in the Georgian Papers Programme.  Queen Charlotte was invested in literature and learning, for herself and her children.  She and the women around her generated important materials… Read More »

Analog King in a Digital Age

Posted on: January 21st, 2017 by Omohundro No Comments

by Karin Wulf See also: What Digital Does: Queen Charlotte Online King George III’s prodigious intellectual curiosity is reflected in his stunning collections of clocks and scientific instruments, his library, and his writing. When we convert this very analog King to digital form, what do we gain? In one of the most poignant examples of… Read More »

A Project of Imperative Importance

Posted on: January 20th, 2017 by Omohundro No Comments

by Barbara B. Oberg The Georgian Papers Programme at Windsor Castle is an ambitious, collaborative enterprise to digitize and disseminate in searchable form an extraordinarily large and rich collection of letters, state papers, and household ledgers from the Archives of George III. The archives contain internationally significant material for a tumultuous period of military conflict… Read More »