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Research

Carving up the Georgian Papers: Metadata and Subject Indexing

Posted on: August 28th, 2018 by Editor No Comments

By James Fisher, Metadata Assistant for the Georgian Papers Programme at King’s College London. Over the past few months I have been compiling lists of subject headings for indexing the Georgian Papers. This is not nearly as straightforward as it might sound. It requires a detailed knowledge of the papers themselves, a broad awareness of… Read More »

Coffee with the Georgian Papers Programme

Posted on: July 11th, 2018 by geoIII No Comments

by Jaclyn Shankel, Early Modern MA student, King’s College London Introduction by Angel-Luke O’Donnell, Liberal Arts Early Career Development Fellow in History, King’s College London As part of the GPP, we regularly host coffee mornings for incoming fellows and other researchers intending to work in the Windsor archives. Coffee mornings are informal events that bring… Read More »

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS GEORGIAN PAPERS FELLOW ANNOUNCED

Posted on: May 30th, 2018 by Arthur Burns No Comments

The Library of Congress has announced the appointment of its Georgian Papers Fellowship. It has been awarded to Dr Nicola Phillips of Royal Holloway, University of London, where she is Co- Director of the Bedford Centre for the History of Women and Gender and is the editor/creator of the Bedford Centre Blog  Following her first… Read More »

Workshop Reflections: Early Modern Collection Catalogues, British Museum

Posted on: March 26th, 2018 by geoIII No Comments

Samantha Callaghan, Metadata Analyst, King’s Digital Laboratory Early Modern Collection Catalogues: Open Questions, Digital Approaches, Future Directions was a workshop held at the British Museum, 15-16 February 2018, and intended to outline and discuss some of the issues that the Enlightenment Architectures: Sir Hans Sloane’s Catalogues of his Collection research team had encountered during their… Read More »

Introducing William IV: A ‘sailor king’?

Posted on: February 20th, 2018 by Arthur Burns No Comments

By Andrew Lambert, Laughton Professor of Naval History, Department of War Studies, King’s College London     Often dismissed as most significant as ‘Victoria’s uncle’, William IV, some of whose papers have now been released as part of the Georgian Papers Programme, in fact played a critical role in stabilizing the monarchy after the extravagance,… Read More »

The commonplace books of Lady Augusta Murray

Posted on: February 19th, 2018 by Arthur Burns No Comments

Dr Jane Mycock explores the significance of Lady Augusta Murray’s commonplace books, one of the new tranche of Georgian papers released to the public in February 2018. Augusta married Prince Augustus Frederick, George III’s sixth son, in 1793 in defiance of the Royal Marriage Act of 1772 which required that the monarch agree to all… Read More »

Mapping the Georgian World: video now available!

Posted on: February 17th, 2018 by Arthur Burns No Comments

We are delighted to announce that you can now watch a video-recording of the richly-illustrated event on ‘Mapping the Georgian World – Maps and Power in the reign of George III’ which was delivered to an enthusiastic audience at the 2017 Arts and Humanities Festival at King’s College London on 9 October 2017. The main… Read More »

The 2018 Sons of the American Revolution Georgian Papers Programme annual lecture 2018

Posted on: February 12th, 2018 by Arthur Burns No Comments

Professor Gabriel Paquette (The Johns Hopkins University) Spain and the American Revolution Monday 26 March 2018, 6.30 pm Venue: The Great Hall, Strand Campus, King’s College London Professor Paquette lectured on Spain’s role in the American Revolution. He is especially interested in the Anglo-Spanish relationship, and the outbreak of war between these two countries in… Read More »

Gender and the Georgian Papers

Posted on: February 5th, 2018 by geoIII No Comments

Samantha Callaghan, Metadata Analyst, King’s Digital Laboratory What information do we need to know about someone so that we are easily able to tell them apart from someone else if they were described to us? Name, age, where they were born? If both people have the same name, for example, J. Smith, and suppose they… Read More »

‘Farmer George’? Notes on Agriculture

Posted on: February 1st, 2018 by geoIII

James Fisher, PhD candidate, History Department, King’s College London Background During his reign King George III acquired the nickname of “Farmer George”, in part due to his agricultural interests and in part as a playful pun – a nod toward nominative determinism given that the name George derived from the Greek word geōrgos (γεωργός) meaning… Read More »