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Publishing the Unpublished: Sir John Fortescue and the Correspondence of George III

Posted on: September 17th, 2018 by geoIII No Comments

By Rachael Krier, Metadata Creator at the Royal Archives Correspondence In my last blog post , I wrote about using The Correspondence of King George III 1760-1783 edited by Sir John Fortescue in cataloguing the official papers of George III. Until recently, the accepted view has been that Fortescue’s Correspondence is widely inaccurate and incomprehensive whereas… Read More »

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS GEORGIAN PAPERS FELLOW ANNOUNCED

Posted on: May 30th, 2018 by Arthur Burns No Comments

The Library of Congress has announced the appointment of its Georgian Papers Fellowship. It has been awarded to Dr Nicola Phillips of Royal Holloway, University of London, where she is Co- Director of the Bedford Centre for the History of Women and Gender and is the editor/creator of the Bedford Centre Blog  Following her first… Read More »

First King’s College London Mount Vernon Fellow announced: Dr Jane Levi

Posted on: March 5th, 2018 by Arthur Burns No Comments

    King’s College London and the Washington Library are pleased to announce the appointment of King’s’ first Mount Vernon Fellow, who will hold a fellowship established to reciprocate that established for the Georgian Papers Programme by the Mount Vernon Ladies Association. The fellowship is open to King’s’ staff and research students, and also to those… Read More »

Introducing William IV: A ‘sailor king’?

Posted on: February 20th, 2018 by Arthur Burns No Comments

By Andrew Lambert, Laughton Professor of Naval History, Department of War Studies, King’s College London     Often dismissed as most significant as ‘Victoria’s uncle’, William IV, some of whose papers have now been released as part of the Georgian Papers Programme, in fact played a critical role in stabilizing the monarchy after the extravagance,… Read More »

The commonplace books of Lady Augusta Murray

Posted on: February 19th, 2018 by Arthur Burns No Comments

Dr Jane Mycock explores the significance of Lady Augusta Murray’s commonplace books, one of the new tranche of Georgian papers released to the public in February 2018. Augusta married Prince Augustus Frederick, George III’s sixth son, in 1793 in defiance of the Royal Marriage Act of 1772 which required that the monarch agree to all… Read More »

George I and George II and the Royal Archives: the missing monarchs?

Posted on: November 9th, 2017 by Arthur Burns No Comments

By Dr Andrew Thompson, Queens’ College, Cambridge   George III is the Hanoverian monarch perhaps most frequently associated with the Royal Archives. The king’s own voluminous correspondence forms an important part of the collection and, in the early nineteenth century, his son, as Prince Regent, was instrumental in helping to secure the two collections that… Read More »

Current research in the Georgian papers: a symposium to take stock, Windsor, 4 September 2017

Posted on: November 9th, 2017 by Arthur Burns No Comments

By Arthur Burns, Academic Director of the Georgian Papers Programme, King’s College London As we launch the second tranche of digitized documents for the Georgian Papers project, this is a good moment to reflect on the progress of academic research related to the project. On 4 September 2017 the Royal Archives at Windsor Castle hosted… Read More »

International Symposium on Enlightened Princesses in Europe 1700-1820

Posted on: October 19th, 2017 by Arthur Burns No Comments

Followers of the Georgian Papers Programme will probably be interested in the Symposium on Enlightened Princesses to be held at Kensington Palace, Hampton Court and the Tower of London between 29 and 31 October. This conference accompanies the splendid exhibition currently taking place at Kensington Palace (highly recommended if you have not seen it –… Read More »

The Admiral and the Aide-de-Camp

Posted on: May 3rd, 2017 by Omohundro 4 Comments

The Revolutionary War Correspondence of Sir Samuel Hood and Jacob de Budé by Jim Ambuske, Ph.D. The portrait of one of the most important British naval officers to serve during the American War for Independence hangs in the Manchester Art Gallery in Manchester, England. The 1783 painting by famed artist Sir Joshua Reynolds depicts Rear… Read More »

PhD Scholarship 2017-2018: Health and Healing at the Hanoverian Court

Posted on: March 29th, 2017 by Editor No Comments

The Professor Sir Richard Trainor PhD Scholarships 2017-18 Project Title: Beyond the Madness of King George: Health and Healing at the Hanoverian Court King’s College London is now inviting applications for one of the Professor Sir Richard Trainor PhD Scholarships in the Department of History at King’s College London in collaboration with the Royal Library… Read More »