Recent Posts

  • By Karin Wulf and Arthur Burns     Does the American Revolution begin with George III?  In Rick Atkinson’s new book, The British are Coming: The War for America, Lexington to Princeton, 1775-1777, the first volume in his planned trilogy on the military history of the Revolution, it does.  It begins, in fact, with the […]

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    Peter Walker is a lecturer in History at the University of Wyoming who studies early modern Britain, the British Empire, and the Atlantic World. He received his PhD from Columbia University in 2016 and his MPhil from the University of Oxford in 2010. He held an Omohundro Institute Fellowship for research at Windsor Castle in […]

  • by Dr Madeleine Pelling (University of York)   For elite and middling women in the eighteenth century, handicrafts including embroidery, decoupage, wood-cutting, turning and spinning were important activities in performing female sociability and manifesting rustic and picturesque ideals. The Georgian Papers Programme has recently digitized a key, though overlooked, album of cut-paper designs created by […]

  • By Dr Michael Rowe, Reader in European History, King’s College London On 20 September 1792, a French army some 32,000 strong defeated a slightly larger force of predominantly Prussian troops near the town of Valmy in north-eastern France. The battle is one of the most important in history. It was by no means the largest […]

  • Among the most important series of papers which the Georgian Papers Programme is digitizing for public access is George III’s official correspondence, otherwise known as the George III calendar and bearing the Catalogue identity GEO/MAIN. This series contains the main series of letters relating to George III’s involvement with the government of his realm as […]

  • As we begin to publish the main body of George III’s correspondence, we hope to provide an appropriate context for those approaching this remarkable series for the first time, reflecting the main new approaches that historians have been taking in the years since the bulk of the scholarship on George’s role in the polity was […]

  • By Karin Wulf and Arthur Burns There is so much eighteenth century on view in the much acclaimed Nottingham Playhouse staging of Alan Bennett’s The Madness of  George III.  The Georgian Papers Programme had a wonderful opportunity to host lead actor Mark Gatiss at Windsor Castle to view some of the archival materials selected to […]

  • In the second of our postings linked to the first release of medical materials among the Georgian Papers, Helen Esfandiary of King’s College London considers inoculation in the royal family. ‘Queen Charlotte (1744-1818) with members of her family’, Johan Zoffany, 1771-72; Royal Collection Trust 401004: the picture includes Ernest duke of Mecklenburg to left, Lady […]

  •   Today, 20 November 2018, Britain’s National Theatre Live is screening a live relay of Alan Bennett’s now classic play, The Madness of George III from Nottingham Playhouse to cinemas across Britain, and in coming weeks the recording of that performance will also be shown in cinemas across the world (and not just in English-speaking […]

  • The Library of Congress has announced the appointment of its Georgian Papers Fellowship. It has been awarded to Dr Nicola Phillips of Royal Holloway, University of London, where she is Co- Director of the Bedford Centre for the History of Women and Gender and is the editor/creator of the Bedford Centre Blog  Following her first […]