Academic Interpretation

Recent Posts

  • George I and George II and the Royal Archives: the missing monarchs?

    By Dr Andrew Thompson, Queens’ College, Cambridge   George III is the Hanoverian monarch perhaps most frequently associated with the Royal Archives. The king’s own voluminous correspondence forms an important part of the collection and, in the early nineteenth century, his son, as Prince Regent, was instrumental in helping to secure the two collections that […]

  • Current research in the Georgian papers: a symposium to take stock, Windsor, 4 September 2017

    By Arthur Burns, Academic Director of the Georgian Papers Programme, King’s College London As we launch the second tranche of digitized documents for the Georgian Papers project, this is a good moment to reflect on the progress of academic research related to the project. On 4 September 2017 the Royal Archives at Windsor Castle hosted […]

  • Sharing Research: GPP Fellows Ann Little & David Hancock

    By Dr Angel Luke O’Donnell, Academic Liaison for the Georgian Papers Programme, and Teaching Fellow in North American History, King’s College London. On 17 July 2017, Windsor Castle hosted the fourth GPP coffee morning. This was the first coffee morning that Windsor has hosted and it was a great chance to share the work on […]

  • Sharing Research: GPP Fellows Flora Fraser & Gabriel Paquette

    By Dr Angel Luke O’Donnell, Academic Liaison for the Georgian Papers Programme, and Teaching Fellow in North American History, King’s College London. On 8 June 2017, King’s College London hosted its third GPP fellows coffee morning. The coffee mornings are opportunities for fellows on various schemes to share their research in the archives. The meetings […]

  • Understanding the American Revolution using George III’s archives

    Professor Andrew O’Shaughnessy was the first Sons of the American Revolution (SAR) Visiting Professor in 2016. The generous support from the Sons of the American Revolution (SAR) enables visiting professors to bring new perspectives to the study of texts uncovered by the Georgian Papers Programme (GPP). Here Professor O’Shaughnessy reflects on the highlights of his […]

  • The Georgian Papers Programme: Slave Trade, Slavery and Abolition in the Royal Archives, c. 1785–1810

    The Georgian Papers Programme: Slave Trade, Slavery and Abolition in the Royal Archives, c. 1785–1810[1] by Suzanne Schwarz (University of Worcester) Georgian Papers Programme Fellow, 2016 The award of a Georgian Papers Programme Fellowship, funded by the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture in Williamsburg, Virginia, provided an invaluable opportunity to trace how… […]

  • America is Lost!

    Dr Angel Luke O’Donnell, Teaching Fellow in North American History, King’s College London Jump to Essay Transcription & Images The ‘America is Lost!’ piece was a short essay written by George III reviewing the causes and effects of the American Revolution. It potentially provides a fascinating insight into the thoughts of King George about the […]

  • Reflections on ‘Essay on Public Opinion’

    Dr Emrys Jones, Lecturer in Eighteenth-Century Literature and Culture, King’s College London Jump to Essay Transcription & Images It may be stating the obvious to point out that what was understood as constituting ‘public opinion’ in the eighteenth century bears little resemblance to the culture of opinion polls and click rates that often accompanies the […]

  • George III and the ‘German Empire’

    Dr Michael Rowe, Senior Lecturer in Modern European History, King’s College London George III’s relationship with Germany was less obviously intimate than that enjoyed by his two predecessors. He proudly and very publicly asserted his British identity, at the expense of his Hanoverian roots: ‘Born and educated in this country, I glory in the name […]

  • Practising monarchy: using digital history to rethink Queen Victoria

    Lee Butcher is a Collaborative Doctoral Award PhD researcher with King’s College London and English Heritage As a political historian and political geographer I am interested in how political practices, and institutions, develop over time, in place, and through space. My PhD research focuses on the role of the monarchy in Britain’s political development during […]