Posts Tagged ‘William IV’

Uncovering Royal Perspectives on Slavery, Empire, and the Rights of Colonial Subjects

Posted on: January 21st, 2019 by Omohundro 1 Comment

By Brooke Newman Dr. Newman is Associate Professor of History and Associate Director of the Humanities Research Center at Virginia Commonwealth University. She was awarded an Omohundro Institute Georgian Papers Programme Fellowship in 2017. In 2017 I spent a month in the Royal Archives tracing how the Georgian monarchs responded to contemporary debates over the… Read More »

Introducing William IV: A ‘sailor king’?

Posted on: February 20th, 2018 by Arthur Burns No Comments

By Andrew Lambert, Laughton Professor of Naval History, Department of War Studies, King’s College London     Often dismissed as most significant as ‘Victoria’s uncle’, William IV, some of whose papers have now been released as part of the Georgian Papers Programme, in fact played a critical role in stabilizing the monarchy after the extravagance,… Read More »

Season’s Greetings from all the team at the Georgian Papers Programme!

Posted on: December 15th, 2017 by geoIII No Comments

Samantha Callaghan, Metadata Analyst, King’s Digital Laboratory, and Arthur Burns, Academic Director, Georgian Papers Programme, King’s College London All those involved in the Georgian Papers Programme would like to send all visitors to our websites, the scholars associated with the programme as fellows, and the King’s Friends season’s greetings and wish them all the best… Read More »

Sharing Research: GPP Fellows Flora Fraser & Gabriel Paquette

Posted on: August 29th, 2017 by Editor No Comments

By Dr Angel Luke O’Donnell, Academic Liaison for the Georgian Papers Programme, and Teaching Fellow in North American History, King’s College London. On 8 June 2017, King’s College London hosted its third GPP fellows coffee morning. The coffee mornings are opportunities for fellows on various schemes to share their research in the archives. The meetings… Read More »

Medicine and the Georgian Navy

Posted on: November 11th, 2016 by geoIII 1 Comment

Ayesha Hussain and Anna Maerker, Department of History, King’s College London The long sea voyages of the Georgian period took their toll on the health of sailors. Most dreaded of all was scurvy, a disease caused by Vitamin C deficiency. On a naval voyage to the South Seas under Captain George Anson in the 1740s,… Read More »